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View Full Version : Archived: L&NW Rly - Denbigh Hall Bridge 08/1838 - 08/09



Tankman
17-08-2009, 05:44 PM
Denbigh Hall bridge, which is located on the A5, Watling street, Bletchley, Bucks, which 1,000's of cars go under every day holds a small but significant milestone in railway history. Most people who drive under it are totally unaware of the plaque that is hidden from view.
Photo's taken at 05.30 in the morning before the hoards get up!

In 1833, Robert Stephenson (1803-1859) was appointed chief engineer of the London & Birmingham Railway the first railway into London. Beginning at Curzon Street Station, Birmingham, and finishing at Euston Station, London, the 112 mile long line took 20,000 men nearly five years to build, at a cost of 5.5 million. (cheap at the price by today's standards):lol:

Denbigh Hall Bridge crosses the Roman road of Watling Street, A5. The bridge is on the London & Birmingham Railway which opened in 1838. However, the section of line between Denbigh Hall station and Rugby opened six months later as the Kilsby tunnel had not yet been built. Passengers were transferred between Denbigh and Rugby in horse drawn coaches.

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii38/tankman_2008/DENBIGH%20HALL%20STATION%20BRIDGE/800px-Denbigh_Hall_Bridge_on_the_Lo.jpg

Drawing of the bridge in 1838.

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii38/tankman_2008/DENBIGH%20HALL%20STATION%20BRIDGE/031.jpg

Taken as near as poss! to the above drawing, the only change has been the relaying of an extra track across the bridge.

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii38/tankman_2008/DENBIGH%20HALL%20STATION%20BRIDGE/Denbigh_Hall_020907b_JPG-1.jpg

The plaque that sits behind a chain link fence and obscured by tree's commemorate's the events that took place at the bridge. (see below for inscription).

http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii38/tankman_2008/DENBIGH%20HALL%20STATION%20BRIDGE/041.jpg

The plaque is on the right hand column.

It reads:
"PRIOR TO SEPTEMBER 1838 THE SOUTHERN PART OF THIS RAILWAY TERMINATED AT THIS BRIDGE. WHERE PASSENGERS WERE CONVEYED BY COACH TO RUGBY WHERE THEY REJOINED THE RAILWAY FOR BIRMINGHAM.
INSCRIBED BY
SIR HERBERT LEON BART
AND LADY LEON OF
BLETCHLEY PARK BUCKS.
BY PERMISSION OF THE L&NW RAILWAY COMPANY
AUGUST 1920

Sir Herbert Leon & Lady Leon lived in Bletchley Park Mansion, a name that would become famous in later years as the home of Ultra and the Code Breakers of WW2:thumb